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Root Canal Treatments in Point Cook

1. Implants 2. Orthodontics - Braces 3. Wisdom tooth & extractions Wisdom tooth Extractions Post operative instructions Sedation/general anesthetic 4. Root canal treatment 5. Periodontics gum care 6. Dentures 7. Preventive dentistry Check-up & Clean Oral hygiene Bad breath solutions Inital consultation Grinding appliances Sports mouthguards Floride treatments 8. Aesthetic dentistry Teeth whitening Bonding Porcelain Veneers Crowns Invisalign 9. Restorative dentistry Composite white fillings Amalgam silver fillings Inlays/Onlays Crowns Bridges Dental implants 10. Children's dentistry Fissure sealing 11. Orthopantomogram (OPG) 12. Lat Ceph 13. 3D Cone Beam 14. Image Delivery 15. Dental Referral Form

Implants

Dental Implants are the latest innovation to replace a missing tooth or a number of teeth. An implant consists of an artificial titanium rod which is placed directly into the jaw bone and acts as a replacement for the root portion of the natural tooth. The implant is made using pure titanium which allows new bone cells to grow around it: the implant then integrates with the newly formed bone which firmly locks it into place. This process is called 'Osseointegration'. A Dental Implant can be used to replace:

  • One tooth - One implant will be placed, a crown will then be fixed on top of the implant.
  • Several teeth - Either several implants and crowns will be placed or a dental bridge will be fitted onto the implants.
  • All the teeth - A number of implants are placed, then either a fixed bridge will be fitted onto the implants or the implants will be used to firmly hold a removable denture.

Orthodontics - Braces

Orthodontics is when the teeth are straightened or moved in order to improve the appearance of your smile by correcting the alignment of your teeth and the way you bite together. An incorrect bite can lead to long term dental problems and even jaw and head pain. By straightening the teeth, you also help to prevent tooth decay and gum diseases as straighter teeth are easier to clean. Orthodontic braces are either fixed or removable

  • Fixed braces consist of brackets and bands which are cemented (glued) to your teeth which hold flexible wires in place. In turn, these wires exert pressure on your teeth gently moving them into their correct position over the course of your treatment.
  • Removable braces can be taken in and out of the mouth. It has delicate wires and springs attached which move the teeth using gentle pressure. These are used for less complex cases or in conjunction with fixed Braces as part of a combined treatment.

Your dentist will refer you to a dentist who specialises in braces 'Orthodontist', or you can refer yourself. At the first appointment, the Orthodontist will discuss with you what you would like to achieve from the orthodontic treatment. You will have an oral assessment, x-rays and moulds taken of your teeth. At the second appointment the orthodontist will outline your treatment plan to discuss all the options available to you. In many cases, permanent teeth need to be taken out to create space in your mouth so that the remaining teeth can be moved. If this is the case, the extractions are carried out by your regular dentist.

It usually takes between 18-24 months but will vary according to how complex the case is. We will provide you with a time frame at the beginning of the treatment; however breakages of the brace will add time to the treatment.

Appointment Three - Small plastic bands 'Separators' will be placed in between your molar teeth. The bands will stay in place for one week to create a space between the teeth for the permanent molar bands. At the next appointment the molar bands, brackets and wires will be put in place. You may find that for the first couple of days your teeth may feel tender to bite and your jaw aches; this is because of the pressure of the brace, taking a headache tablet will help. If the discomfort lasts longer than a few days, make an appointment to see your orthodontist to see if your brace needs adjusting. You may find that your brace may also rub against the inside of your lips or cheeks. If this is the case, use the wax which your orthodontist will have supplied. You will now need to see your Orthodontist every six to eight weeks to have the bands and wires changed, tightened or indeed elastics added. If you have had your brace tightened, you may fell a little discomfort later in the day which is a normal and a headache tablet will help. You still require regular six month check-ups with your dentist to ensure your gums and teeth are healthy.

You will be able to eat most of the foods you were eating before, but more care will need to be taken not to damage your braces. There are some foods that have to be cut out of your diet whilst you are wearing the appliance.

  • Toffees
  • Chewy sweets, like Mars bars or starburst for example
  • Hard foods, like crusty bread and apples

Also think twice before opening bottles with your teeth, biting pen tops or chewing your finger nails as these can also damage your braces. It is very important that your oral hygiene is excellent as cleaning your teeth is much more difficult with a brace in place. Brushing your teeth after every snack and meal throughout the day will reduce the risk of decay and gum disease. In addition, take longer brushing your teeth in the morning and at night. Ask your Orthodontist which is the best type of tooth brush for cleaning braces. If you do not look after your teeth during your treatment they can become permanently stained.

After your treatment is complete Your braces will be removed and your teeth cleaned and polished to remove any remaining cement. Your treatment is not over as the teeth need to be held in position while the surrounding gum and bone settles. This period is called retention and the appliance that holds the teeth are called retainers, which are either fixed or removable. Depending on the type of retainers, Impressions may to be taken in order for the retainers to be made at the dental laboratory. You will then return a week later to collect your retainers.

Wisdom Tooth

Adults have up to 32 teeth, of which four are wisdom teeth and these are the last to come through the gum. They are the one's right at the back of the mouth and usually appear between the ages of 17 and 25 although sometimes they can appear in later years.

If there is enough room in the mouth the wisdom teeth will come through (erupt) in a useful position and there will only be minor discomfort as they erupt. However, wisdom teeth can cause problems if there is not enough room in the mouth, as the wisdom tooth erupts at an angle and gets stuck against the tooth in front; the dentist will describe this as 'Impacted'.

The dentist will be able to assess whether there is sufficient room for the teeth to come through by taking an x- ray which will show the position of the root. Once the x-rays have been taken, the dentist will be able to tell how easy or difficult it will be to remove the tooth. The dentist will then determine whether the tooth should be taken out at the Dental Practice or by a Specialist Oral Surgeon. The dentist will only recommend taking out wisdom teeth if:

  • The teeth are not able to fully erupt through the gum and are causing an infection in the surrounding tissue; this is known as Pericoronitis.
  • There is decay present - wisdom teeth will often decay as it is very difficult to clean them as thoroughly as your other teeth.

Following the removal of wisdom teeth, there is likely to be some discomfort. However, this will vary depending on how difficult it was to remove the tooth; it is not uncommon to experience some swelling for a few days. The dentist will advise on how best to reduce this discomfort and may recommend pain killers such as Paracetamol or Ibuprofen. A further dental appointment will be necessary for the dentist to check the healing process and remove any stitches.

Extractions

Dental Extraction is a removal of a tooth from the mouth. It is performed for a wide variety of reasons.

  • Tooth decay - If the decay is severely advanced and the nerves and blood vessels in the tooth have been infected, and are unsuitable for root canal treatment. Impacted wisdom teeth - Sometimes our mouths are simply not big enough to accommodate these teeth. The teeth become impacted (stuck), this can cause infection and pain.
  • Orthodontics (braces) - Teeth can erupt in many different positions, if this happens you may have to have teeth extracted so your other teeth can be brought into line.
  • Periodontal disease - Bacterial infection under the gum damages the tissue which connects the tooth to the gum; as the disease progresses, the bone anchoring the tooth to the jaw begins to dissolve, resulting in the tooth becoming loose.
  • Teeth that have been damaged by trauma.
  • Certain medical conditions may require teeth to be extracted.

Your dentist will examine your tooth and explain the reasons why your tooth needs to be extracted, an x-ray will be taken to help plan the best way to remove the tooth and to see if an abscess is present. If an abscess is present your dentist will give you a course of antibiotics before your tooth is extracted.

Your dentist will ask you about your medical history. You must list every medication you are taking even if you have purchased it from over the counter, as some medications can complicate an extraction Tell your dentist if you are anxious about the procedure as sedation is available. If your dentist does not carry out sedation he will refer you to a practice that does. There are two types of extraction

1/ A simple extraction is performed when the tooth can easily be seen in the mouth. The dentist will give you a local anaesthetic to numb the area around the tooth. When the anaesthetic has taken affect and the area around the tooth is numb the dentist will grasp the tooth using a pair of forceps, you will feel pressure but NO pain. The dentist will move the forceps back and forth to loosen the tooth in order to extract the tooth.

2/ Surgical Extractions - This is carried out on teeth which -

  • Cannot be seen in the mouth but are present below the gum.
  • Partially showing through the gum
  • Broken off at gum level.

A local anaesthetic will be administered to numb the area before a small incision is made in the gum. The gum is pulled back to expose the whole of the tooth or the root. The dentist then uses the same procedure as a simple extraction to remove the tooth, in some cases the tooth or root may have to be cut into pieces to be removed.

3/ When the tooth has been removed a swab will be placed at the extraction site and you will be asked to bite on this until the bleeding has stopped and a blood clot has formed.

After the extraction a blood clot will form in the socket were the tooth used to be, this is NOT to be disturbed by vigorous rinsing or poking the site with your tongue or finger as it is a very important part of the healing process. If the socket does start to bleed after you have left the dental practice, place a clean tissue or handkerchief over the extraction site and apply pressure by biting down, the bleeding will normally stop within a few minutes. Again do NOT disturb the blood clot. If the bleeding does persist please contact your dentist for further advice.

Your mouth will still be numb for an hour or so after the local anaesthetic, please take care not to bite your cheek or tongue or burn your mouth when drinking hot liquids. Avoid Smoking and Alcohol for 24 hours as these can have an effect on the healing process. You may be in discomfort after the anaesthetic has worn off, take a household painkiller (headache tablet) following the manufacture's instructions. Do NOT take Aspirin as this may cause the socket to bleed.

Post Operative Instructions

After the extraction a blood clot will form in the socket were the tooth used to be, this is NOT to be disturbed by vigorous rinsing or poking the site with your tongue or finger as it is a very important part of the healing process.

If the socket does start to bleed after you have left the dental practice, place a clean tissue or handkerchief over the extraction site and apply pressure by biting down, the bleeding will normally stop within a few minutes. Again do NOT disturb the blood clot. If the bleeding does persist please contact your dentist for further advice. Your mouth will still be numb for an hour or so after the local anaesthetic, please take care not to bite your cheek or tongue or burn your mouth when drinking hot liquids.

Avoid Smoking and Alcohol for 24 hours as these can have an effect on the healing process You may be in discomfort after the anaesthetic has worn off, taking a household painkiller will help (headache tablet) following the manufactures instructions. Do NOT take Aspirin as this may cause the socket to bleed.

Sedation/General Anesthetic

Dental Sedation If you have a fear of dentists or of dental treatment sedation is an option for you. It enables dental treatment to be carried out whilst you are relaxed and makes your visit much more pleasant. It is commonly used on patients who have a fear or phobia of dental treatment. This fear can be for a number of reasons including:

  • Fear of pain
  • Extremely sensitive teeth
  • History of traumatic dental experiences
  • Complex dental problems

The underlying issue is that whatever phobia patients may have, they will often choose to neglect dental treatment because of this phobia and thus create more damage to the teeth. Sedation not only helps the patient but also greatly assists the dentists as they are able to carry out the procedure with greater cooperation from a relaxed patient. It is the use of sedative medications in order to make the patient more relaxed and to allow the dentist to perform the necessary dental procedures. These medications range from tranquilizers to anxiolytics and can be administered in a number of ways. These medications do not send you to sleep, though you will feel sleepy and relaxed.

There are a few different types of sedation dentistry that facilitate performing dental procedures:

  • Oral conscious sedation - is exactly as it says, the patient is given oral sedatives which will relieve most of the stress although he will remain conscious in order to follow any instructions given by the dentist. You will be given a sedative to be taken before you go to bed at night and another sedative to be taken the next morning when you wake up. These sedatives will make the patient feel drowsy and have a similar effect to amnesia and you may not remember a lot about the procedure. Although oral sedatives cannot relieve pain, you will be relaxed when the dentist administers the local anesthetic . Due to extreme drowsiness effect, you are advised not to drive to or from the dental surgery.
  • Inhalation sedation - Nitrous oxide - this is more commonly known as laughing gas as one of the effects is the feeling of happiness. Nitrous oxide is very popular with the dentists as it only takes around 5 minutes from inhaling for it to take effect and because of how quickly a patient recovers from it. Typically the patient will remember very little of the procedure and can sometimes fall asleep. The added advantage of Nitrous oxide is that it can be used for the exact time span for which sedation is needed, unlike oral sedatives which have a specific and limited effect. Additionally, Nitrous oxide can be administered in incremental doses until the desired level is achieved.
  • Intravenous sedation - this is sometimes referred to as IV sedation and is a drug administered through an injection to make people feel like they are asleep. You actually remain conscious and can follow the dentists instructions although the feeling of relaxation is so intense that you are unlikely to remember much about the procedure. The sedation is administered into the vein and can only be performed by an experienced and trained dentist. The common anti anxiety sedatives that are used for IV sedation are benzodiazepine, propofol, and other medications. Although IV sedation is very popular it is not recommended for patients with fear of needles, if you are pregnant, suffer from glaucoma, lung or kidney problems or if you are allergic to sedative drugs. Additionally, older patients are not recommended for IV sedation.
  • Local anaesthetic - This works by blocking nerve impulses to the site where the dental procedure is being performed. An anaesthetic gel or spray which has a numbing effect may be applied before the local aesthetic injection is administered. Under local aesthesia you are fully conscious although you do not feel any of the effects of the treatment.
  • General anaesthetic - General aesthesia is used to facilitate oral surgery and can be used for people who are not eligible for sedation dentistry. General aesthesia leads to a state of unconsciousness and the side effect may last for several hours after the procedure is done.

Root Canal Treatment

This dental procedure is carried out when the innermost part of the tooth 'the pulp' becomes badly decayed or infected. If left untreated, the tooth will begin to die which could lead to the loss of the tooth. To save the tooth, the infected pulp needs to be removed to prevent the formation of an abscess. In dental terms this procedure is called 'Endodontics' The tooth is made up of

  • Enamel - The hard outer layer of the tooth.
  • Dentine - This forms the core and gives the basic shape to the tooth which supports the enamel, it is softer than enamel but harder than bone.
  • Pulp - Is the central part of the tooth which contains nerves and blood vessels and lies within the root canal

The reason the pulp would die

  • Caries - If caries 'decay' is left it will travel through the enamel and dentine down into the pulp chamber.
  • Trauma - A severe knock that affects the pulp.
  • Severe Gum Disease - The gum detaches itself from the tooth creating a gap between the tooth and the gum, bacteria then gets trapped causing an infection which can infect the pulp.

The symptoms

  • Pain - This can be anything form a constant dull ache to severe pain or pain only when biting
  • A spot sometimes appears on the gum in the area of the infected tooth, this is where the collection of puss from the root tip is draining which will leave a bad taste in your mouth.
  • Swelling in the gum area surrounding your tooth

Periodontics Gum Care

Periodontal Disease is the later stages of gum disease. This is when the bacteria infection under the gums progresses deeper and affects the bone and tissue supporting the tooth. Your gums will -

  • Bleed when brushing or flossing.
  • Will be red, swollen and tender.
  • Bad Breath.
  • The gum will have pulled away from the tooth, this is called 'Pocketing'
  • Pus may be seen in the pockets around the tooth.

The infection damages the tissue that connects the gum to the roots of the tooth. Once the tissue has been destroyed the gum pulls away from the tooth, this forms a pocket which bacteria thrive in. If not treated, in time the bone anchoring the teeth in the jaw will dissolve, making the teeth loose and eventually the teeth will fall out.

Periodontal disease is irreversible, but you can slow down the progression by regular visits to the Dentist and Hygienist also improving your oral hygiene at home.

Dentures

Dentures are a removable appliance used to replace missing teeth, They are fabricated using either acrylic or cobalt chrome to which false teeth are added. They help with speech, chewing, add support to your lips and chin as well as improving the appearance of your smile. There are two types of dentures -

  • Partial denture which replaces one tooth or several teeth.
  • Full denture which replaces the whole set of teeth, on the upper or lower.

Dentures are kept in place by either using clasps which anchor around neighbouring teeth or by the dentures' natural suction. On occasions a denture fixative or glue is recommended to aid in keeping the denture in place. All dentures are designed by the dentist or our dental technician to suit each patient's individual needs.

Check-up & Clean

Our team of qualified dentist offers the highest level in patient care to ensure optimal oral health through maintenance and preventative programs and patient education. The dentist has specialist training in the meticulous cleaning and maintenance of the teeth and gums and will develop a personalized oral hygiene program to suit patient's individual needs. This program aims to maintain healthy teeth and gums and prevent decay and gum disease. Healthy gums are a long term investment for beautiful teeth and the dental hygienist will monitor your oral hygiene helping you to achieve your optimal oral health.

  • Appointments include
  • Evaluation of health and gums
  • Meticulous cleaning and polishing of the teeth including below gum level
  • Identification of oral conditions such as bad breath and dry mouth and aid in treatment of such
  • Advice on oral products to aid specific oral conditions
  • Application of decay preventing agents
  • Taking of dental x-rays for diagnostic purposes
  • Instruction on correct brushing and flossing techniques and advice on appropriate oral hygiene products to suit the individual
  • Outline of a personalized oral hygiene program with recommended 3, 6 or 12 monthly visits, recommended future treatment and referral for specific treatment if required

We stock a wide range of products and the dentist will recommend certain product suitability for individuals.

  • Toothbrushes - manual/electric
  • Interdental cleaning devices and irrigation devices
  • Oral cleaning aids for patients with implants
  • Oral rinses and specialty products for oral conditions such as 'dry mouth'

Use a soft toothbrush at the gum line where the teeth meet the gums. Brush in small circular motions on 1-2 teeth at a time. Angle the brush at a 45 degree angle to allow the bristles to gently clean under gums. Brush top and bottom teeth, cheek-side, lip-side and in close to the tongue. Brush the chewing surfaces of all upper and lower molars. Brush the top of the tongue to remove bacteria. Electric tooth brushes are effective if used systematically, i.e. brushing only a small area at a time. Correctly brushing is important to your dental health. Break off about 40cm in length of dental floss, ribbon or tape. Wind the ends around the longest, middle fingers. This leaves the index fingers and thumbs free to move. Try to keep only 1cm tight enough to slide between teeth. Leave about 5cm each side for "leverage". Slide using a "sawing" motion between teeth. Do not force the floss since it will hit the gums and hurt. Slide up and down each tooth to clean off plaque and food debris. Continue to floss all teeth. To reach your back teeth, it helps to close your mouth enough to soften cheek muscles.

Oral Hygiene

In order to keep your gums healthy you need to remove the daily build up of plaque from all the surfaces of your teeth by - Brushing your teeth twice a day, for two minutes each time. Ask your dentist which type of tooth brush is best for you, as many of us use brushes that are too hard or too large. Floss your teeth, as a toothbrush doesn't always reach into the gaps in between the teeth or below the gum line. Do not brush your teeth too hard as this can damage your gums, ask your dentist or hygienist to show you the correct technique Use fluoride toothpaste. Healthy gums are -

  • Pink in colour
  • No areas of redness or inflammation
  • No bleeding when brushing or flossing
  • No tenderness or discomfort

If the daily build up of plaque is not removed this can lead to the first stages of gum disease 'Gingivitis' Gingivitis is caused by sticky bacteria which are known as 'plaque'. Plaque collects in the small gaps between the gums and the teeth and if not removed by regular brushing & flossing will multiply by feeding on sugars found in your food and drink. This can lead to -

  • Bleeding when brushing or flossing
  • Soreness or discomfort
  • Appear red in colour, puffy or swollen

Bleeding when brushing or flossing your teeth is the earliest and most common sign of gingivitis. Gingivitis is reversible if treated by a hygienist or by improved brushing and flossing techniques. However, if left untreated you will develop the later stages of gum disease, which is known as 'Periodontal Disease'. Periodontal Disease is the later stages of gum disease. This is when the bacteria infection under the gums progresses deeper and affects the bone and tissue supporting the tooth. Your gums will -

  • Bleed when brushing or flossing.
  • Will be red, swollen and tender.
  • Bad Breath.
  • The gum will have pulled away from the tooth, this is called 'Pocketing'
  • Pus may be seen in the pockets around the tooth.

The infection damages the tissue that connects the gum to the roots of the tooth. Once the tissue has been destroyed the gum pulls away from the tooth, this forms a pocket which bacteria thrive in. If not treated, in time the bone anchoring the teeth in the jaw will dissolve, making the teeth loose and eventually the teeth will fall out Periodontal disease is irreversible, but you can slow down the progression by regular visits to the Dentist and Hygienist also improving your oral hygiene at home.

Bad Breath Solutions

Bad breath (or halitosis) is an unpleasant odour which can occur from time to time or be long lasting. The main cause of bad breath is in the mouth. We have millions of bacteria that live in the mouth, particularly on the back of the tongue and these bacteria feed on the food debris that accumulates in the mouth and between our teeth. The bacteria give off a sulphur compound and it is this that creates the bad odour. Smoking and drinking alcohol contribute to the unpleasant odour. There are other conditions which affect the airways and stomach that can lead to bad breath too. Improving your oral hygiene is the most effective way to eliminate bad breath. Brushing teeth and tongue twice a day using fluoride toothpastes, as well as flossing, will remove the bacteria which generally removes the odour. Other things that help are -

  • Drinking plenty of water
  • Chewing sugar free gum after meals
  • Stopping smoking
  • Eating a well balanced diet
  • Making regular visits to your dentist

The other causes of bad breath (which can be treated by your dentist) are

  • infection of the gums (Periodontal disease)
  • decayed teeth
  • a condition called 'Dry mouth' affecting the flow of saliva

If your dentist finds that your mouth is healthy but you still have bad breath, you may be referred to your family medical practitioner as there are other causes of bad breath -

  • Sinusitis and bronchitis.
  • Problems within the stomach.
  • Diabetes.
  • Liver and kidney problems.

Inital Consultation

The first people you will meet will be our friendly reception staff, who will ask you to complete a medical form. Our dentist needs to be aware of your general state of health as this can often impact upon the condition of your teeth and gums and may effect medication such as anaesthetics and antibiotics we may use for you. At your consultation you will have the opportunity to discuss any dental concerns you may have or how you would like your teeth improved. Your dentist will give you a full oral assessment to help accurately plan which treatments would be best for the health of your mouth. During this examination we will be looking at -

  • Teeth and the way you bite
  • Original restorations - Filling, crowns, veneers etc
  • The health of your gums and surrounding bone around each tooth
  • Your tongue, throat, cheeks & lips for signs of oral cancer
  • Jaw joint evaluation

Dental X-rays will also be taken of your teeth to check for -

  • Decay inside the tooth or between the teeth.
  • Abscess or cysts on the roots of your teeth.
  • Root positions
  • Bone loss

Once the examination is complete the dentist will dicuss the findings with you. We will then create a treatment plan with alternative options for you, including all the benefits and risks of each procedure and the costings. This will allow you to decide what is best for your long term dental health.

Grinding Appliances

Teeth grinding is a surprisingly common occurrence and often happens whilst asleep. Most people are therefore unaware that they are grinding and only come to realise it when their partner complains of the noise the following morning. Other noticeable effects of grinding (bruxism) are:

  • Ear ache
  • Jaw pain
  • Facial and neck pain
  • Sleep disorder - both yourself and partner
  • Sensitivity to hot and cold drinks

The most common reason for grinding is when we try and compensate for an imperfect bite. This is when the upper and lower jaw comes together but the teeth don't seem to fit comfortably and you therefore try and force them into a perfect bite. Imagine chewing hard but with no food in your mouth. You may also find that you suffer from jaw clenching, which if combined with grinding, will cause greater discomfort and damage to the teeth. It is also thought that stress can lead to grinding although you may be equally unaware that you are doing so as it often happens during your sleep.

As you try to compensate for the imperfect bite you end up biting harder and thus causing damage to the enamel on your teeth. It becomes a vicious circle as you bite harder to try and make the teeth fit better you end up creating more damage to your teeth by initially wearing down the tooth's enamel to gradually wearing down the tooth itself. As most grinding occurs during your sleep, the most common solution is the use of a mouth guard to prevent such grinding. This helps reduce the pressure of tooth grinding and helps prevent further damage to your teeth. Your dentist may also be able make adjustments to your teeth order to achieve a better bite and thus reduce the subconscious effort you are making

Naturally, if your grinding is a result from stress then you should learn relaxation techniques and stress management.

Sports Mouthguards

Mouthguards are made from a plastic material called Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA). EVA is strong and tough and can be easily moulded to fit precisely over your teeth and gums. Mouthguards are the most effective protective pieces of equipment to help prevent injury to the mouth - protecting the teeth, lips, cheeks and tongue. A mouthguard does not only protect your mouth, it can also cushion blows to the mouth or jaw therefore preventing damage to the jaw, neck or brain.

Having a dentist take special impressions will create a guard to perfectly fit your mouth, teeth and gums, providing ultimate protection. The procedure is very simple; your dentist will take moulds of your teeth both upper and lower. They will be sent to the dental laboratory where our technician will fabricate your custom made guard. Your sports mouth guard will need replacing over time. Just bring it along to your check-ups and your dentist will inspect it for wear and tear.

Fluoride Treatments

Fluoride is a natural mineral found in food and water which helps to strengthen teeth and prevent tooth decay, by making the tooth more resistant to acid attacks from plaque and sugars. If fluoride is lacking from the diet, the teeth will be prone to tooth decay and cavities. The hard outer surface of the tooth is called 'enamel', which contains mineral crystals. Everyday plaque bacteria and sugars in the mouth attack the enamel causing it to weaken. This process is called 'demineralisation'. Minerals such as fluoride, calcium and phosphate from the food and water we consume and the toothpaste we use, helps to strengthen the enamel. This process is called 'remineralisation'. Fluoride speeds up the remineralisation process. Fluoride intake is very important when teeth are developing; it can be taken into the body in two ways -

  • The food and drink we consume or supplements.
  • Fluoride toothpaste, mouthwashes or when applied directly to the teeth by the dentist or hygienist.

Fluoride treatments are offered to children who have a number of cavities or are at high risk of developing cavities. Adults can benefit too. Fluoride treatment is a very simple process administered by the dentist or dental hygienist which helps to prevent tooth decay.

  • The teeth will be cleaned to remove any food debris, staining.
  • A high concentrate fluoride foam or gel is placed into an arch shaped dental tray which is inserted over the teeth and left for the required time. Alternatively, a fluoride varnish is painted on to the tooth surface.
  • Nothing should be eaten or drunk for 30 minutes after the treatment to allow the fluoride to penetrate the teeth.

Fluoride supplements are available; please speak to the dentist to see which supplement is best for you or your child.

Teeth Whitening

Tooth whitening has become one of the most popular ways to improve your smile by lightening the existing shade of your natural teeth. This is a simple and effective treatment which can be carried out by your dentist or at home. Tooth whitening is non-invasive treatment which does not involve drilling or removal of the tooth surface. There are many reasons why your teeth can become discoloured

  • Drinking tea, coffee or red wine
  • Food with strong colourings
  • Smoking
  • The natural act of ageing
  • A tooth which is damaged by trauma
  • Some teeth are naturally pigmented or stained as they develop
  • Certain medications

Only natural teeth respond to tooth whitening, Crowns, Bridges, Dentures or Implants cannot be whitened. The outer surface of the tooth is called 'Enamel' this has tiny microscopic holes which trap everyday stains. Tooth whitening gel is a peroxide based compound which penetrates the holes removing the stains and lightening the teeth. Your dentist will arrange for you to have a consultation appointment, where your teeth and gums will examined, you can then discuss which of the tooth whitening option would be best for you. Whitening can be carried out in the surgery, this way your teeth will be several shades lighter in one to two hours. There are many methods used to achieve whiter teeth whilst in the dental chair, all the methods follow a similar procedure -

  • Your gums will be protected using a rubber coating
  • A Peroxide based gel will be applied to your teeth. The gel will begin to work upon contact with the tooth or will be activated using a laser light.
  • After a period of time the gel and the protective coating are removed to reveal whiter teeth

Your dentist will provide you with the whitening kit which contains Custom made whitnening trays and a peroxide based gel. To have the trays made -

  • Home whitening can take up to 14 days to achieve your desired shade.
  • An impression (mould) is taken of your teeth using special dental "putty". The putty is placed into an impression tray; they are both then inserted into your mouth and pushed onto your teeth in order to take an impression.
  • Once the dental putty is set the impression will be removed.
  • The moulds are sent to the Dental Laboratory where our technician will fabricate your custom made whitening trays.
  • The peroxide gel is placed into your trays the tray is then placed onto your teeth for a period of time.

The degree of whitening will vary from patient to patient, greyer teeth can take longer to respond. Tooth whitening is not permanent; the whitening process will need to be repeated every 12 - 18 months to keep your teeth at the shade you desire.

Bonding

Dental bonding, also known as composite bonding, has been used in dentistry for many years. It is an excellent way to repair cracked, chipped and discolored teeth as well as replacing silver amalgam fillings. Dental bonding can also be used to close gaps and reshape misaligned teeth, providing a straighter, more uniform smile.

Bonding is probably the most conservative of all the cosmetic dentistry. It involves minimum alteration to the original tooth enamel, and is reversible if none of the tooth enamel is removed. The results are seen immediately. Bonding has been used for many years, bonding composite to teeth is a very popular option because the material used matches very closely to the shade of your natural teeth. The Procedure:

  • A local anaesthetic will be given to numb the tooth and the surrounding tissue - not all bonding procedures require an injection
  • The tooth will be isolated from the rest of your teeth using a 'rubber dam' which is a thin sheet of rubber placed over your mouth. It is used to keep the tooth dry as saliva can compromise the bond of the composite.
  • The tooth will be thoroughly cleaned. All decay, food debris or tartar will be removed.
  • The tooth is prepared using a phosphoric-acid-based gel; this roughens the surface of the tooth. A bonding agent (glue) is applied to the roughened surface and set using a concentrated beam of ultraviolet light. The composite is then applied in layers and set at each stage using the ultraviolet light. The composite will be continued to be applied in layers until the desired shape is achieved.
  • The last stage is to polish the restoration to achieve the final shape and smooth finish.

Porcelain Veneers

A veneer is a thin layer of tooth coloured material which is placed over your natural tooth to mask the underlying enamel. Veneers are designed to enhance the appearance of your teeth by:

  • Masking permanently stained teeth.
  • Closing Diastemas - spaces between your teeth.
  • Straightening misaligned teeth.
  • Improving the appearance of damaged or broken teeth due to decay or trauma.

The procedure is usually completed in two visits which is a simple and relatively quick route to improve your smile, the first part of the procedure involves the dentist removing a small amount of enamel from the front of your tooth and the second appointment the veneers are fitted into place. Each veneer is individually handcrafted by our dental technician to correct the appearance of your teeth to create a healthy natural look. The first part of the procedure will be a consultation appointment, this is when you can discuss with the dentist the concerns you have with your teeth and explain how you would like them improved. Your dentist will have a 'Diagnostic wax up' made of your teeth to show how your teeth will look with veneers. This is a very simple procedure; the dentist will take impressions (mould) of your teeth and these will then be sent to the laboratory. Our technician will make a cast of your teeth using the supplied impressions (moulds). Dental wax is then applied to the cast, to show how the final veneers will look. If you decide that veneers are for you, two appointments are then needed. The first appointment is when the dentist prepares the teeth and then a second is to fit the veneers. The Preparation appointment:

  • The dentist will give you a local anaesthetic to numb the tooth and the surrounding gum.
  • A small amount of tooth is removed from the front surface of your tooth to make room for the veneers. The dentist will do this using a fast hand drill.
  • An impression (mould) is taken of your teeth using special dental "putty". The putty is placed into an impression tray; they are both then inserted into your mouth and pushed onto your teeth in order to take an impression.
  • Once the dental putty is set the impression will be removed. An impression is also taken of the opposing teeth, so the technician can see how you bite together.
  • The dentist may fit temporary veneers to protect the teeth whilst your veneers are being fabricated. The impression (mould) of your teeth is sent to the Dental Laboratory where each veneer will be handcrafted to create your new smile. This process can take between two and three weeks.

The Fit Appointment:

  • Your temporary veneers will be removed and your teeth will be washed to remove any remaining cement.
  • Your new veneers will be temporarily placed using a special paste which will allow the dentist to make any adjustments that are required and to make sure that you are happy with the appearance.
  • The veneers will then be removed and the tooth surface prepared for the dental adhesive. The veneers will be permanently cemented in place to create the beautiful smile you have been waiting for.

Veneers can last a long time but a lot depends on how you take care of them. You must maintain good oral hygiene brushing and flossing twice a day, also have 6 monthly examinations with your dentists. Habits that damaged your natural teeth, like biting pens and pencils, opening bottle tops with your teeth and biting your nails will also damage your veneers.

Crowns

A crown is a tooth shaped cover which fits over the existing structure of your natural tooth to protect and restore the tooth's function. Crowns can be used to -

  • Strengthen teeth which have been weakened by decay or a large filling.
  • Protect fractured, cracked and worn teeth.
  • Improve the shape, alignment and shade of a tooth.
  • After root canal treatment, to help strengthen the tooth.

Each crown is individually handcrafted by our dental technician to create a healthy, natural look.

Invisalign

Invisalign is the modern way to get the beautiful straight teeth you've always wanted - without braces. Schedule a consultation with our team so we can determine if Invisalign is right for you. Invisalign uses a series of invisible, removable, and comfortable aligners that no one can tell you're wearing. So, you can smile more during treatment as well as after. Invisalign is made with 3-D computer imaging technology and has been proven to be highly effective and accurate, especially for adults.

Not only are the aligners invisible, they are removable, so you can eat and drink what you want while in treatment. Plus, brushing and flossing are no problem. They are also comfortable, with no metal to cause mouth abrasions during treatment. No metal and wires usually means you spend less time in our practice getting adjustments. Invisalign also allows you to view your own virtual treatment plan when you start so you can see how your straight teeth will look when your treatment is complete.

You wear each set of aligners for about 2 weeks, removing them only to eat, drink, brush, and floss. As you replace each aligner with the next in the series, your teeth will move - little by little, week by week - until they have straightened to the final position we have prescribed. You'll visit us about once every 6 weeks to ensure that your treatment is progressing as planned. Total treatment time averages 9-15 months and the average number of aligners worn during treatment is between 18 and 30, but both will vary from case to case.

Composite White Fillings

Fillings are the most common type of 'restorative treatment'. A filling replaces the part of the tooth that has been lost because decay has caused a cavity in the tooth or because the tooth has broken. One option in restoring the tooth is to have a white filling, commonly known as a 'Composite Filling'. Many people have fillings, the majority being grey metal called 'Amalgam'. Fillings do not just have to be practical, they can also be aesthetically pleasing and thus many patients no longer have the desire for amalgam fillings because they are visible : with most white fillings, no-one would know it was there. Composites are:

  • Composite are referred to as white fillings. Composite is a tooth coloured material composed of glass particles suspended in a resin matrix. It is available in several shades to perfectly match your tooth.
  • Composites are bonded directly to your tooth which can help to support the remaining tooth structure.

Composites can be used for a variety of cosmetic dental procedures -

  • Repairing chipped or broken teeth
  • Closing gaps between your teeth (diastemas)
  • Reshaping your teeth

Composite is not ideal for all restorations on back teeth especially if you have a large cavity, as bonding does not have the strength over large areas or if you have a heavy bite, grind or clench your teeth. The alternative tooth coloured restoration then would be an inlay or onlay.

Amalgam Silver Fillings

Fillings are the most common type of 'restorative treatment'. A filling replaces the part of the tooth that has been lost either because decay has caused a cavity in the tooth or because the tooth has broken. One option in restoring the tooth is to have an Amalgam filling however with high quality tooth coloured fillings available, amalgam usage is now declining. Amalgam - Sometimes referred to as a silver filling. This is an alloy which is made up using Mercury, Silver, Tin, Copper and Zinc. It is extremely durable and able to withstand the grinding and chewing of the molar teeth over long periods of time. They are less expensive than white fillings The disadvantages:

  • They look unattractive in the tooth due to its colour.
  • Some people are concerned about the mercury content; please discuss this with your dentist.
  • Amalgam expands and contracts with temperature which can weaken the remaining tooth.
  • The colouring leaches into the dentinal tubules inside the tooth, leaving a permanent blue-gray halo that bleaching cannot remove.

The Procedure:

  • A local anaesthetic will be given to numb the tooth and the surrounding tissue.
  • The tooth will be thoroughly cleaned. All decay, food debris or tartar will be removed. The tooth will then be shaped to accept the amalgam by mechanical retention rather than being bonded or cemented.
  • Depending on the size of the filling, a band may be placed around the tooth which helps to hold the filling material in place whilst it is being packed into the tooth.
  • The Amalgam is packed into the tooth, then carved in to the correct shape.

Although amalgam hardens within a few minutes, it takes 24 hours for it to set fully.

Inlays/Onlays

Inlays and Onlays are restorations that are used to rebuild a tooth that has lost a significant amount of its structure due to decay or trauma. Similar to dental fillings but rather than being directly placed into your tooth and then set, they are fabricated in our dental laboratory and then cemented into place. This is known as an 'indirect procedure'. Inlays fit into the tooth whereas onlays sit on top of the remaining tooth structure. Inlays and Onlays can be constructed using:

  • Porcelain
  • Gold
  • Composite

Your dentist will evaluate your tooth to see if it is suitable for an Inlay or Onlay and also decide which material is best. Two appointments will be necessary: the first to prepare the tooth surface and the second to fit the Onlay or Inlay. The first appointment:

  • A local anaesthetic is given to numb the tooth and the surrounding tissue.
  • Any decay that is present will be removed and the tooth surface will be prepared for the restoration.
  • An impression (mould) is taken of your teeth using special dental "putty". The putty is placed into an impression tray; they are both then inserted into your mouth and pushed onto your teeth in order to take an impression.
  • Once the dental putty is set, the impression will be removed. An impression is also taken of the opposing teeth, so the technician can see how you bite together.
  • A temporary restoration will be placed on the prepared tooth to protect it whilst your Inlay or Onlay is being fabricated.
  • The impression is sent to our Dental Laboratory where our technicians will custom make your Inlay or Onlay. This can take up to two weeks.

The Fit Appointment:

  • A local anaesthetic may be needed to numb the tooth and surrounding gum.
  • The temporary restoration will be removed and the tooth cleaned.
  • The dentist will then try in your new Inlay or Onlay, making sure the fit is perfect, your bite is comfortable and you are happy with the appearance. The Inlay or Onlay will then be permanently cemented in place.

Bridges

A bridge is one of the options to replace one or more missing teeth. It is a permanent fixture which is anchored to the adjacent natural tooth or teeth (the abutment) to 'bridge' the gap where the tooth (or teeth) is missing (the pontic). This also prevents the adjacent natural teeth from drifting. A bridge is a great option if you do not wish to have dental implants or a denture to replace your missing tooth or teeth. There are many different designs and materials which can be used for bridges: your dentist will discuss the best option for you.

Each bridge is individually handcrafted by our dental technician to create a healthy, natural look which also sits comfortably with your bite.

Children's Dentistry

Oral hygiene is important in early years, to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Regular Dental check-ups help your dentist to help you prevent and treat decay before it causes cavities and toothache. Children should start to visit the dental practice as young as possible, so bring them along with you to your check-ups. They may be too young for an examination but the visits helps to familiarise them with the surroundings, the smells, noise and most important they meet the dentist. The examinations will be informal to start, a quick look using a dental mirror. Counting the teeth and looking for signs of decay. As the child's confidence grows your dentist will carry out a more thorough examination.

The check up - The dentist will look at the following:

  • Which teeth have erupted (come through the gum).
  • Accessing the development of the jaw.
  • Looking at the soft tissues (tongue, cheeks, lips and throat).
  • Checking for cavities in the teeth.
  • As the child gets older we will assess the how they bite together to check if orthodontics are required later on.

We give advice on preventive care:

  • Healthy diet.
  • Brushing techniques.
  • Fluoride treatments if necessary.
  • Fissure sealants if there's a high risk of cavities developing.

How to take care of your child's teeth: Oral hygiene starts as soon as your child's first tooth erupts through the gum, this is around six months of age. Use a small and very soft child's toothbrush and a rice sized amount of children's tooth paste. As this contains less fluoride than adult tooth pastes; if you are unsure about the fluoride content please speak to your dentist or health visitor.

Brush twice a day once in the morning and before bed, cleaning the teeth and the gum area. You will need to clean your child's teeth or supervise until they are around 8 years old. Encourage your child to spit the toothpaste out but not to rinse with water as this reduces the effects of the fluoride. Do NOT allow your child to fall asleep with a bottle of milk, formula milk or any fruit juice as these have hidden sugars which will pool around the teeth as they sleep, leading to cavities. Limit the amount of sugars in your child's diet. If they do have sugary snacks and drinks keep them to meal times only and give water and healthy snacks in between. If your child is prone to tooth decay in their baby teeth your dentist may recommend fluoride treatment as this helps to strengthen the tooth surface. Then as the adult teeth erupt through the gum, it may be advised that a protective layer is painted onto the tooth's biting surface, which is called 'Fissure Sealants'.

Fissure Sealing

Fissure sealant is a tooth coloured liquid which is applied on the chewing surface of adult molar teeth to prevent cavities from forming in early years. Once applied the coating is permanent, and will stay on your teeth for a number of years.

Why do I need fissure sealants? Your back teeth are known as premolars and molars and have pits and grooves on the biting surface, some of which can be deep and difficult to keep clean with brushing. Food particles can become trapped and this creates a perfect breeding ground for plaque bacteria which if left, will generate cavities. Fissure sealants work by filling the deep pits and grooves making it easier to clean your teeth and thus helping to prevent cavities from forming. The Procedure:

  • The teeth which the sealants are being placed on will be cleaned and dried.
  • The chewing surface of the tooth will be prepared to accept the Fissure Sealant.
  • The Fissure Sealant is applied to the tooth using a small brush and then hardened by concentrated beam of ultraviolet light.

Orthopantomogram (OPG)

An Orthopantomogram (OPG) or Dental Panoramic Radiograph (DPR), also known as a "panorex", is a panoramic scanning dental X-ray of the upper and lower jaw. It shows a two-dimensional view of a half-circle from ear to ear. An OPG relies on tomography i.e. images of specific radiographic planes are taken to make up the larger panoramic image.

Lat Ceph

Cephalometric analysis is the study of the dental and skeletal relationships in the head. It is frequently used by dentists, often orthodontists in particular, as a treatment planning tool. Cephalometric analysis depends on cephalometric radiography to study relationships between bony and soft tissue landmarks and can be used to diagnose facial growth abnormalities prior to treatment, in the middle of treatment to evaluate progress or at the conclusion of treatment to ascertain that the goals of treatment have been met.

3D Cone Beam

Cone beam 3D imaging is a breakthrough diagnostic technology in dentistry. Cone beam CT scanning is a compact, faster and safer version of regular CT. The use of a cone shaped x-ray beam allows a dramatic reduction in the size of the scanner, the radiation dosage and the time needed for scanning. We have specifically selected our scanner because of its combination of low dose radiation and maximum diagnostic information.It is used for Implant surveys for implant planning, IAN survey for wisdom tooth extraction planning, and RCT survey for better root canal treatments.

More and more dentists are using our X-ray Cone Beam Computer Tomography (CBCT) scanners for patient imaging and diagnostics. The result is advanced, state-of-the-art volumetric images that increases the quality and accuracy of radiographic dental care. When using CBCT imaging, clinicians have the most accurate anatomic information to plan the placement of dental implants in optimal sites by using our technologically advanced digital imaging services.

Image Delivery

Our usual image delivery are as follows:

Email:

  • OPG
  • Lat Ceph
  • Wisdom Tooth IAN Survey for 18, 28, 38 & 48
  • RCT Survey

Hard copies:

  • 3D Cone Beam Implant Survey

DVDs:

  • 3D images with Romexis viewing software
  • 3D images in DICOM format

Any hard copies requested will be delivered within 3 working days. Do feel free to give us a call should you have any additional request.

Dental Referral Form

Looking to have an OPG or 3D Cone Beam taken for your patients? Wants good quality images and fast image delivery? Concern about the cost to patients?

Fast Delivery
The turnaround time for our image processing is usually 3 working days, however if you require us to put you on priority, just highlight it to us.

Easy Access
You may email, fax or have the patient bring along the referral form, we will accept as long as the referrer's details are complete and signed.

Excellent Images
All our images are digitally taken and processed with our latest Planmeca equipment, yielding good images and low radiation does for your patients.

Cost Effective
We provide high quality images at competitive prices for your patients.

Should you require us to send you our referral pads, please feel free to call us at 9897 1569 or email us at crystal.boxhill@gmail.com

f: 9899 7778 e: crystal.boxhill@gmail.com

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